Apr 19, 2006

It's an Idiom, Idiot.

A plague on both your houses
often quoted as a pox on both your houses

Meaning:
Frustrated curse on both sides of an argument.
The phrase is commonly applied to criticize warring
factions whose rivalry brings ruin to others.

Origin:
From Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet.

MERCUTIO I am hurt.
A plague o' both your houses! I am sped.
Is he gone, and hath nothing?

Idiom:
id·i·om n.

1. A speech form or an expression of a given
language that is peculiar to itself grammatically or
cannot be understood from the individual meanings of
its elements, as in "keep tabs on".


Cut and pasted from these sources:
http://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/14450.html
http://www.answers.com/topic/a-plague-on-both-your-houses
www.dictionary.com



None of which means I wish my daughter, my cat, or my
husband any true ill (Although I might wish my husband a
temporary itchy rash somewhere inconvenient) no matter w
hat my husband thinks.

And I am furious that he'd believe I would truly wish my
infant daughter, no matter how frustrating at times, ill.

3 Comments:

Blogger Robin said...

I wonder if he's yanking your chain. I mean really... he could be playing off what you said knowing it will make you mad. My Chris and I suppose myself (although I don't know for sure) are passive aggressive. Could the DH be too? I found a link. http://www.passiveaggressive.homestead.com/PATraits.html

12:08 AM  
Blogger Robin said...

Hey I looked at that link closer and it goes into the issues of that problem in the extreme. My point is that the temperament we share has a tendency to be more that way.

12:57 AM  
Blogger peppypilotgirl said...

Oh yeah... he definitely tends toward passive aggressive behaviour. Although I think reading the information I sent him on the phrase addressed it this time; he was much more civil when he came home.

Interesting info...

10:48 AM  

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